Friday, June 4, 2010

Important Info From Dr. Simka

I received this info from the doctor in Egypt. Dr. Simka in Poland wrote this. I think the last paragraph speaks for itself:

Our main goal of diagnostic procedures is to find all significant (i.e. impairing the outflow) venous lesions. Consequently, we perform Doppler sonography and MR venography as screening tests. Theoretically, both these examinations are not necessary, but in some patients (~10%) they are very important (anatomical variants, borderline pathology, unoperable lesions). Doppler sonography and MRV are only screening tests, i.e. they reveal that there is a pathology and in most of the cases they predict were the pathology is situated. But they are not 100% accurate. Intraoperative venography is far more reliable, but even this test is not perfect. So a combination of Doppler + MRV + intraoperative venography is better. Now, we think about applying also IVUS (intravenous ultrasonography), but it will substantially increase the cost, so most likely we will use it only in selected cases.

Regarding the treatment, we opt for the most safe and the most efficient treatment, which of course is not possible, since those two parameters don't meet it every case. Balloon angioplasty has already been demonstrated to be very safe in a short time, and most likely safety in long time is also nearly perfect. But balloon angioplasty is not very efficacious. In some cases it doesn't work at all, in the others there are late restenoses. The short-term efficacy of an alternative treatment - stenting is much higher. But long-term efficacy (risk of late occlusion) is not known. Although occluded stent can be opened, but probably not in every case. And of course there are known early complications related to stents, namely the migration, that exclude some anatomic variants from stenting (at least using currently available stents). There is also possible the open repair of the vein, but risk and efficacy of such procedures are not known. Thus, all treatment modalities should be regarded as experimental, with still unknown efficacy and safety. The doctors always try to balance the risk and the efficacy factors, but the best solution is not always possible and is not always chosen (importantly, we don't have data on long term consequences of ballooning or stenting).

Now, what about impact of the treatment for CCSVI on clinical course of MS. Our data indicate that the things are far more complicated than it might be suspected.
1. CCSVI is not an equivalent for MS; most likely, MS = CCSVI + some (probably more than one) other factors
2. Consequently, treating CCSVI does not mean that MS is gone. Most of the patients experience good and bad days following surgery, importantly, during infection, stress, etc. the symptoms usually go back. But the symptoms also go back in a case of restenosis.
3. Treatment of CCSVI does not guarantee improvement. There were some patients (not much, still, they were) who experienced worsening. Most of those patients presented with severly narrowed veins that could not be sufficiently managed with ballooning or stenting, but there were also cases with "perfectly" done surgery. So, a patient can improve after surgery (a majority, especially relapsing remitting patients), but no improvement or even worsening is also possible. A reoperation can improve the symptoms in the latter two groups, but again, not in all cases.
4. Probably, surgery for CCSVI + pharmaceutical treatment will improve outcomes. Try to continue your neurological medication if it were working before surgery.
5. Many patients who suffered from transient worsening of symptoms, improved after inclined bed therapy. You can try it, even if not efficient, at least it is 100% safe6. Postoperative Doppler examination is sometimes puzzling. In most of the patients the flow just after the suregery is still pathologic. Threfore we don't perform it after operation (we don't want to stress the patients). Even after some days there are still flow abnormalities, especially after ballooning. So, we think that patient should look at his/her symptoms first.

And, importantly, current situation when patients must travel thousands of miles to have the treatment is neither normal nor is it safe. At the moment healthcare systems seem to overregulated. It must be changed. Especially, cooperation with neurological community and big universities with access to big public money is pivotal. Surgery is not the only solution, it must be augmented by something else.
Marian Simka >>

10 comments:

  1. I happened upon your blog earlier today. My mother in law is headed to India tomorrow for CCSVI treatment. I look forward to continuing to follow your progress.

    Blessings!
    Shena

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  2. NBenes,
    Please send me the clinic info for Alexandria as my wife has MS and I would like to send her there. My address is ntambakis@hotmail.com.
    Thank you. +Fr. Nikolaos

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  3. Please send us the name and the clinic address of the doctor in Egypt who treated you, it's for a similar case and thanks you in advance,
    cnr@sympatico.ca

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  4. There are available treatment options here in the US. THere is a clinic in Utah that performs the liberation procedure. Before trekking across the globe please take the time to look in your own backyard. You might be surprised what you find

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  5. After 6 months of offering stem cell therapy in combination with the venous angioplasty liberation procedure, patients of CCSVI Clinic have reported excellent health outcomes. Ms. Kasma Gianopoulos of Athens Greece, who was diagnosed with the Relapsing/Remitting form of MS in 1997 called the combination of treatments a “cure”. “I feel I am completely cured” says Ms. Gianopoulos, “my symptoms have disappeared and I have a recovery of many functions, notably my balance and my muscle strength is all coming (back). Even after six months, I feel like there are good changes happening almost every day. Before, my biggest fear was that the changes wouldn’t (hold). I don’t even worry about having a relapse anymore. I’m looking forward to a normal life with my family. I think I would call that a miracle.”

    Other recent MS patients who have had Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation (ASCT), or stem cell therapy have posted videos and comments on YouTube. www.youtube.com/watch?v=jFQr2eqm3Cg.

    Dr. Avneesh Gupte, the Neurosurgeon at Noble Hospital performing the procedure has been encouraged by results in Cerebral Palsy patients as well. “We are fortunate to be able to offer the treatment because not every hospital is able to perform these types of transplants. You must have the specialized medical equipment and specially trained doctors and nurses”. With regard to MS patients, “We are cautious, but nevertheless excited by what patients are telling us. Suffice to say that the few patients who have had the therapy through us are noticing recovery of neuro deficits beyond what the venous angioplasty only should account for”.

    Dr. Unmesh of Noble continues: “These are early days and certainly all evidence that the combination of liberation and stem cell therapies working together at this point is anecdotal. However I am not aware of other medical facilities in the world that offer the synthesis of both to MS patients on an approved basis and it is indeed a rare opportunity for MS patients to take advantage of a treatment that is quite possibly unique in the world”.

    Autologous stem cell transplantation is a procedure by which blood-forming stem cells are removed, and later injected back into the patient. All stem cells are taken from the patient themselves and cultured for later injection. In the case of a bone marrow transplant, the HSC are typically removed from the Pelvis through a large needle that can reach into the bone. The technique is referred to as a bone marrow harvest and is performed under a general anesthesia. The incidence of patients experiencing rejection is rare due to the donor and recipient being the same individual.This remains the only approved method of the SCT therapy. For more information visit http://ccsviclinic.ca/?p=838

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  6. Thanks for sharing a idea....Great post and informative
    CCSVI Cancun

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  7. David Summers, a 37 year old MS patient from Murfreesboro, Tennessee was a score of 8.0 on the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) when he had the Combination Liberation Therapy and Stem Cell Transplantation at CCSVI Clinic in March of 2012. Having been diagnosed in 1996 he had been in a wheelchair for the past decade without any sensation below the waist or use of his legs.
    “It was late 2011 and I didn’t have much future to look forward to” says David. “My MS was getting more progressive and ravaging my body. I was diagnosed as an 8.0 on the EDSS scale; 1 being mild symptoms, 10 being death. There were many new lesions on my optic nerves, in my brain and on my spinal cord. My neurologist just told me: ‘be prepared to deteriorate’. I knew that he was telling me I didn’t have much time left, or at least not much with any quality.” David had previously sought out the liberation therapy in 2010 and had it done in a clinic in Duluth Georgia. “The Interventional Radiologist who did it told me that 50% of all MS patients who have the jugular vein-clearing therapy eventually restenose. I didn’t believe that would happen to me if I could get it done. But I have had MS for 16 years and apparently my veins were pretty twisted up”. Within 90 days, David’s veins had narrowed again, and worse, they were now blocked in even more places than before his procedure.
    “I was so happy after my original procedure in 2010. I immediately lost all of the typical symptoms of MS. The cog fog disappeared, my speech came back, the vision in my right eye improved, I was able to regulate my body temperature again, and some of the sensation in my hands came back. But as much as I wanted to believe I felt something, there was nothing below the waist. I kind of knew that I wouldn’t get anything back in my legs. There was just way too much nerve damage now”. But any improvements felt by David lasted for just a few months.
    After his relapse, David and his family were frustrated but undaunted. They had seen what opening the jugular veins could do to improve him. Because the veins had closed so quickly after his liberation procedure, they considered another clinic that advocated stent implants to keep the veins open, but upon doing their due diligence, they decided it was just too risky. They kept on searching the many CCSVI information sites that were cropping up on the Internet for something that offered more hope. Finding a suitable treatment, especially where there was no known cure for the disease was also a race against time. David was still suffering new attacks and was definitely deteriorating. Then David’s mother Janice began reading some patient blogs about a Clinic that was offering both the liberation therapy and adult autologous stem cell injections in a series of procedures during a hospital stay. “These patients were reporting a ‘full recovery’ of their neurodegenerative deficits” says Janice, “I hadn’t seen anything like that anywhere else”. She contacted CCSVI Clinic in late 2011 and after a succession of calls with the researchers and surgeons they decided in favor of the combination therapies.For more information please visit http://www.ccsviclinic.ca/?p=904

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  8. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ysFiW26MHfQ&feature=player_embedded#t=0s
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BfSOmij8tfk&feature=youtu.be
    Over the past year, CCSVI Clinic and its researchers and specialists have been studying the Combination venoplasty/autologous stem cell infusion protocol developed by Regenetek Cellular Technologies with the collaboration of outside labs and bioproducts manufacturers. As laboratory techniques gain ever-increasing sophistication based on new scientific methodologies for enhancing somatic cells into preferred lineages in vitro, the therapeutic outcomes for patients with neurological disorders have also been improving. Deb O’Connell who was treated at the Clinic in mid-September, 2012 recovered so quickly from her serious long-term degenerative disease condition that she experienced a wave of improvements while still in the hospital.
    It’s a matter of medical record that Deb had been wheelchair bound for 10 years (completely non-ambulatory) with multiple co-morbidities when she entered the program on September 9; she was 9.5 on the EDSS scale as assessed by a neurologist, was down to 80 lbs in body weight, could not breathe effectively, speak, or take in food by mouth due to dysphagia. Her pain was chronic and significant. When she left the Clinic on September 24th , she walked out of the doors and into a waiting van to go to the airport. At the time of her discharge from the Clinic, she could breathe normally, effectively speak once again, eat any types of food she desired and her pain had all but disappeared. At the time of this writing she is back home in Canada and reports that she continues to recover (especially her contractured hands), shows no signs of new disease symptoms, and has gained 18 lbs since her therapies, less than 3 weeks ago. She has now begun a regular physiotherapy program and is gaining walking strength and balance. The recapitulation of the course of her disease (MS) within days, provides evidence that the in vitro requirement of cell pluripotency has correctly been identified with respect to adult cell source origin, time, and manipulation in culture. http://www.ccsviclinic.ca/?p=1084
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ysFiW26MHfQ&feature=player_embedded#t=0s
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BfSOmij8tfk&feature=youtu.be

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  10. A significant world-wide population of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients have a chronic progressive neurological disease that is characterized by increasing disabilities. No treatments are currently available that slow, halt, or reverse the advancement of the disease in established cases of MS. The frustration in a growing number of patients and their readiness to pursue unproven therapies speaks to the lack of effective treatments available and is further indicative of a vast, unmet clinical need. On the basis of evidence that there is a vascular association to MS (characterized by anomalies of primary veins in the neck that restrict the normal outflow of blood from the brain to the heart), and that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have a beneficial effect in acute and chronic cases of multiple sclerosis as determined in various clinical trials, we undertook the assessment of the safety, efficacy, and reproducibility of a novel approach that has vascular-protective, neuroprotective and regenerative therapeutic potential for all phases of multiple sclerosis.For more information please visit http://www.ccsviclinic.ca/?p=1194 or you may call the toll free number at 888-468-1554 or info@ccsviclinic.com

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